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Plant Profile: Golden Yarrow

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​The first day of spring is just around the corner, meaning the Irvine Ranch Natural Landmarks will be full of color from spring blooms!
 
The golden yarrow, or Eriophyllum confertiflorum, is a member of the daisy family and can be found in a variety of habitats including chaparral, coastal sage scrub and southern oak woodland. This small, brightly colored flower is native to California, growing from San Francisco down to San Diego and Baja California, as well as parts of the Sierra Nevada mountains.

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Due to its long blooming season, which can last from winter to summer, the golden yarrow is a favorite amongst native plant gardeners. They also provide an ideal food source for native pollinators, attracting a variety of butterflies and bees.
 
Characterized by its gray-green stems that grow in large clumps, each stem is topped with a cluster of up to 30 flowerheads that consist of a large center of disc florets. At first glance, each stem seems to grow a single flower, but as you get closer, you will find several small, daisy-like flowers growing in a cluster that make up the flowerhead.
 
Keep a lookout for bright golden yarrow on your next outing on the Landmarks! Seven-day access trails in Bommer Canyon, Quail Hill and Buck Gully Reserve are currently open daily for self-guided hikes from dawn until dusk. To learn more about native plants found on the Landmarks, visit letsgooutside.org.