Skip to content
Invasive Species Control

CASE STUDY

IRC 2023 Annual Report: Invasive Species Control
Controlling non-native and invasive plants and animals is essential to the success of many of IRC’s other programs.

Controlling non-native and invasive plants and animals is essential to the success of many of IRC’s other programs.

Non-native and invasive plants and animals are one of the biggest threats to the long-term health and sustainability of wildlands in Orange County. They degrade visitor experiences, reduce wildlife populations, and increase wildfire risk. Controlling these invaders is essential to the success of many of IRC’s other programs such as Habitat Restoration & Enhancement, Wildfire Prevention & Management, and even Community Engagement & Education.

In 2023, IRC and the City of Irvine opened a new Nature Garden in the City’s Bommer Canyon Preserve. Once overrun with weeds, the area provided almost no habitat for local wildlife. IRC volunteers removed thousands of invasive plants, replaced them with natives, and installed interpretive signage. This revitalized area now tells the story of the land’s ranching history while educating the community about native plants and their role in providing habitat for wildlife and a healthy ecosystem.

 

In 2023:

  • Removed more than 665,000 invasive plants from public wildlands.
  • Monitored success of invasive Gold Spotted Oak Borer control efforts in Weir Canyon. After 7 years surveys show little spread and a reduction in severely infested trees.

 

Check out the full 2023 Annual Report here.